First Borneo Days.

All Sunday afternoon activities have come to a sudden halt, the heavens have opened, its pouring with rain and everyone has either gone home or is sheltering in a restaurant. That’s the problem here in Kota Kinabalu, there is constantly so much to do, and everyone is out doing it, whether it be eating or snacking at the endless cafes and restaurants, shopping at the many, many markets, admiring the view over the South China Sea or just hanging out, the choices are endless. Hence, a rather long interval since the last blog entry, sorry.

I have done some of the required touristy things, which as a newcomer I suppose I must do and the first was a ride on the North Borneo Railway. Left behind by the British it runs down the coast for about thirty miles and is powered by a steam locomotive built in England in the 1950s. Breakfast was provided on arrival in one of the original refurbished railway carriages and was served by people in contemporary dress, sure a bit corny, but not too tacky. Chuffing through the jungle was a good introduction to Borneo, the World’s third largest island, and only motivated me to go explore some more. I got to ride in the cab for a little while, no nanny state here! We reached the end of the line, the locomotive spun round on a turntable, re connected, and off we went again. Lunch, served in Tiffin cans, again a bit corny but wildly practical. A Tiffin can is a kind of lunch box, but much more exotic and in widespread use, here, there and all over India, especially. Other passengers included Brits, obviously, Germans, French, a Hungarian lady and two Americans, one from Detroit even and that was just my carriage. OK it was a train ride and I really like trains but it was just a little bit over the top, just a little, though you would have to be an arch cynic to decry it.

There is a splendid lady, Nora, who runs the reception desk at my hotel, always full of ideas and places to go. Next then was an Orangutan rehabilitation center. (note: orang-utan, orangutang or orang-utang) Set in the grounds of the very, very up market Shangri La Hotel about forty five minutes out of town it was a bit of an expensive taxi ride there and back and as an introduction to the wildlife wonders of Borneo it worked. Of course I got totally lost amongst the lavishness of the hotel, gazing around rather overwhelmed at the opulence and had to return to reception for a map, no, there were no signposts. There was a patriotic video to start things off, highlights included the fact that ten percent of the world’s orchids are to be found on the local mountain ( Mt Kinabalu) and that there is more bio diversity to be found in one square mile of the Borneo rain forest than in all of North America and Europe combined. All right then. Off on a steep path into the rain forest until we came to a wooden deck, three levels, with a small platform about twenty feet away. The excitement built as we observed branches moving high in the canopy and then, there they were, two young male Orangs not twenty feet away. Cameras whirred and clicked, iPads blocked the view (again), children cried, not sure why, some just stood and gazed, I know I did because, not being a pushy kind, I was relegated to the back. The Orangs ate and interest dwindled, people sauntered away and I could finally take a photo or two.

It wasn’t the greatest experience but a great intro and tomorrow I am off to a wildlife reserve about six hours on the bus away. I’ll let you know how it goes.

You are never far from the sea in KK and wandering around it flashes into view at the end of the street from time to time. Next then was to get out on to the water. I took a boat ride to one of the many islands lying off shore. You know me, on a speed boat bouncing over the waves, the light shimmering on the water, the view changing constantly, the colors, the wind, yep, heaven. It was just the six of us on the island, there was diving, canoeing, snorkeling etc available but I was content just to sit on the sand and look around. It was fairly hot but interestingly because of the position, five degrees north of the equator I could feel myself burning after a few minutes despite a liberal slathering of sunscreen and spent considerable time in the shade.

Talking of geography, I watched the sunset one evening and realized after it had set that forty-five minutes later that same sun rose, in Seattle. Mind boggling.

Train. In Borneo.

Train. In Borneo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tiffin cans.

Tiffin cans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chuffing along.

Chuffing along.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pith helmet. The works.

Pith helmet. The works.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orangutans.

Orangutans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More of same.

More of same.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meal time.

Meal time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Again.

Again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the table.

At the table.

 

 

Advertisements

13 responses to “First Borneo Days.

  1. all sounds great, love the pith helmet xx

  2. Terry loved the train, sounds wonderful where you are.x

    • Yes it is, quite wonderful thanks.
      The further I go into the rain forest the better it becomes.
      Sadly I don’t think there will be any more trains in my near future.
      Boats yes, trains no.
      Hope Terry likes boats!

      • Yes,boat trips are equally revealing for unseen places and sights. Enjoy and relish each moment as it unfolds.

  3. Wow, that’s all sounds very exciting. Could it possibly be the Biologist Don Perry at the Urangutan Reserve there? We met him many years ago in Costa Rica before he built the tram. Love the photos!

  4. Hey Tim, I love trains, I love wildlife and I love your writing, “though you would have to be an arch cynic to decry it.” You never mention bugs, the kind that bite and sting and are generally menacing. Is it really that idyllic? xoxo Happy Valentines Day.

    • Idyllic might be stretching the definition of the word!
      I am however idyllically out of my comfort zone.
      Train was great, wildlife too is all its cracked up to be and more.
      Bugs, lots. It is recommended that we wear long pants and sleeved shirts. I met an Irish girl today who didn’t and she was quite alarmed when she found herself covered in leeches. They fell from a tree. Mozzies are pesky and the noises from the jungle last night made me think of Jurassic Park.
      Thanks for the critique.
      Happy V Day to you too xx

  5. Loved the train trip. Shades of the Watercress Line. Am sure Vicky would love the orangs! Sorry I missed you today.
    Mother

    • Yes, the train trip was quite a highlight, pure escapism, but a highlight.
      Riding in the cab was a goal set in the very olden days.
      I will try to call again at the weekend.

  6. I wholeheartedly endorse Jeannie’s comment! The train journey must’ve been fabulous – and the tiffin cans – what a great experience. Gorgeous orang-utans, however you may spell them. All that lushness of leaf too… could practically feel it in your blog. Enjoy!

    • It’s odd you know but it has happened before.
      Suddenly there is an opportunity to scribble a blog and without notes or plans it just pours out on the page, then I receive more page views and comments than the most carefully planned Post. I actually thought that last posting was a bit amateur and rushed but wanted to share some experiences.
      But there you go.
      The lushness of leaf is all very well but makes photos particularly difficult.
      I spotted a long tail lemur in a tree today (as one does) but could I get the whole thing in one shot. No. Leaves in the way. And you can’t really ask them to move just a little bit, can you.
      Thanks again for the endorsement.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s